Share

Sign In

Lose something?

Enter Username or Email to reset.

Sign Up

Painted Brain | Older Adults And Depression
About 68% of older adults aged 65 and older know little to nothin
post-template-default single single-post postid-7870 single-format-standard _masterslider _msp_version_3.2.2 woocommerce-no-js logo_left full-width full-width cp_hero_hidden older-adults-and-depression cp_fixed none cpcustomizer_off megamenu no-header no-header unknown_browser cp_breadcrumbs_hidden opensignal dark_menu_background wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.7 vc_responsive
  • Share on Facebook
     
  • Share on Twitter
     
  • Share on Google +
     
  • Share on Pinterest
     
  • Share on Linkedin
     
  • Share on Tumblr
     
  • Share on Vk
     
  • Share on Reddit
     
  • Share by Mail
     
Elderly population and depression

Older Adults and Depression


Depression affects people from all ages.

Did you know that older adults are at an increased risk for experiencing depression?

Depression is not a normal part of the aging process. However, there is a likelihood of it occurring when there are other physical health conditions. 80% of older adults have at least one chronic health condition and 50% have two or more. [1] Often times, symptoms of depression are overlooked and go untreated when they coincide with other medical illnesses or life events that commonly occur as people age. [2]

A study done by Mental health America found out that:

About 68% of older adults aged 65 and older know little to nothing about depression. This can be a reason as to why older adults do not talk about it when they see their healthcare providers or do not know how to explain their symptoms. Thus, not receiving proper treatment and intervention.

It is important to help older adults recognize symptoms of depression.  These are some of the most common symptoms of depression according to National Institute of Aging [3]:

  • Persistent sad, anxious, or “empty” mood
  • Feelings of hopelessness, guilt, worthlessness, or helplessness
  • Irritability, restlessness, or having trouble sitting still
  • Loss of interest in once pleasurable activities
  • Decreased energy or fatigue
  • Moving or talking more slowly
  • Difficulty concentrating, remembering, making decisions
  • Difficulty sleeping, early-morning awakening, or oversleeping
  • Eating more or less than usual, usually with unplanned weight gain or loss
  • Thoughts of death or suicide, or suicide attempts
  • Aches or pains, headaches, cramps, or digestive problems without a clear physical cause and/or that do not ease with treatment
  • Frequent crying

It is important to talk about depression and its symptoms no matter what age. It is essential to be on the lookout for educating older adults about it. They need our attention and support especially if they are not aware about what depression is and what it can cause to their health.

[1]  https://www.cdc.gov/aging/mentalhealth/depression.htm

[2] http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/conditions/depression-older-adults-more-facts#1

[3] https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/depression-and-older-adults

  • Share on Facebook
     
  • Share on Twitter
     
  • Share on Google +
     
  • Share on Pinterest
     
  • Share on Linkedin
     
  • Share on Tumblr
     
  • Share on Vk
     
  • Share on Reddit
     
  • Share by Mail
     

Post A Comment